All posts filed under: filmmaking & writing

Anything Can Happen

I realise that this romantic notion of a suffering and starving filmmaker is still firmly imprinted on a lot my fellow filmmakers’ minds. But unfortunately, in our global, on steroids, changing market place, this idea only can harm filmmakers, not bring anything positive to their long-term careers.  In reality, it doesn’t matter how great your project is, how much time you spend making your film or show, and how much it cost you (my guess is that with an indie production your funding will be pretty limited). If you have no way of showing and screening your film to the audience, you are screwed. You need an audience, and it doesn’t matter if you made your film for the cinema release, film festivals, or online platforms. You want and need eyeballs to watch your work. However, marketing, promotion and getting your film in front of the audience is not an easy task and throughout the world young filmmakers are being taught that this job should be done by the marketing and promotional departments. Of course, …

6 Stages of Successful Digital Marketing Campaign Plan for Your Film

In other words, your digital marketing campaign plan is not going to be successful without following those stages one after another. STAGE 1 Building awareness of your project, which includes: audience building, a page like ads, poster, trailer, or promotional video. STAGE 2 Validation, which includes: rave reviews, features, interviews, TV, radio, online appearances, and guest blog posts. STAGE 3 If you are doing the theatrical release, you will need geo-targeted ads with an obvious Call to Action button that links to the ticketing website or your film’s landing page. You must be very clear about what you need your visitors to do. STAGE 4 If you are taking the iTunes road, pre-orders are an essential part of your campaign. Pre-orders will help you rank higher on iTunes which is a massive advantage in today’s overcrowded market. For stage 4 to be successful, you should create a shareable 30-sec spot with a Call-to-Action button that links to your own iTunes store. STAGE 5 To kick off a successful TVOD (iTunes, Amazon and/or Vimeo On Demand) …

Effective Pitching For Filmmakers, Writers and Storytellers

Before you even begin to think about pitching  your projects to anyone, I would strongly advise you to answer and identify the following questions: – What is your target market? Do you know your target market, niche audience? Who is going to buy your product, idea or service?– What are the benefits your target market can achieve by working with you or by buying your product? – What problems are you going to solve for your target market?– Do you have a category under which your product/offering can be featured? How can you describe your product? – What results your market needs & wants that you can help them achieve?– Have you got a few (2-3) keywords describing your product or offering that can be used for your marketing & promotional purposes? – Have you checked out your competition to see what they do to promote their work or product? Once you can comfortably answer the above questions, you are ready to start working on structuring your pitches. Having answered the questions above will make …

One Pager

I like making a One Pager for every scene in my shooting script. One Pager is for me only and reminds me of all the most important things I need in the scene for it to work for the audience. My One Pager consists of: The scene in a nutshell (one line, what the view is about). How did the previous scene end? (precise ending of the last scene and how that will impact the current scene). What are the beats in the scene and where are they (on which line, movement, gesture)? What are each characters’ objective/s in the scene? Are the characters going to reach their scene objectives or not? What is the stage direction for each character (what I have imagined and would like to try out with the actors)? How is the scene going to end (what frame, movement, or gesture)? What are the characters wearing (I know that this is the costume department, but I like making a note of the costumes, especially when/if the character is wearing something very …

The Recipe for a Good Family Movie

As a parent, I watch a lot of PG, family-friendly films and over the years I realised that the most successful family films have those five things in common: 1. One of the characters is an animal. It doesn’t have to be the main character, but the animal is an integral part of the whole plot, like ‘Babe’ or ‘Stuart Little.’ 2. The main character is usually an underdog and comes from the background with either financial difficulties, or emotional baggage, has a lot of self-doubts, and their confidence is either very low or doesn’t exist at all. During the film, the character discovers that the confidence doesn’t come from the external possessions but the inner strength. Good examples here are ‘Charlie and the Chocolate Factory’, ‘Hugo’, or ‘Karate Kid.’ 3. Kids can easily identify with the character because they experience the emotional upheavals often felt and agonised over by themselves, such as lack of friends, feelings of isolation and not being part of the group, feeling alienated at school, especially when they struggle or …