All posts filed under: Writing

Pitching Your Projects 

Pitching projects to decision-makers, other filmmakers, financiers, and anyone else who could help you get your project off the ground is not an easy job. It requires skills and practice, as well as determination and persistence. There are specific formulas for pitching projects at different pitching stages. Usually, you wouldn’t just go into a meeting or meet someone at the part and straight away offer them your complete pitch. You typically start with a comparable pitch or with a logline before you move any further, and it is only if the listener asks you for more information about your project. The best way to practise your pitching skills is in front of other people, and way before you arrive at your big meeting. Practice will help you get comfortable with your pitch, and it will also help you work out what works and what doesn’t in your formula. Personally, I like printing out my pitch to read it out loud. This exercise helps me find out where my language is a bit wobbly or where I …

You Made A Film What Happens Next

This is the big question; one every filmmaker asks themselves during the production process. Partially, you should know who your target audience is, and who is going to watch your film, before you start the development process and invest a ton of time and energy into that project. The sooner you start thinking about your distribution options and possibilities, the sooner you will be able to start the marketing and promotion efforts. And, the sooner you start to market and promote your film, the bigger the audience you will be able to reach, and the more fans you will be able to find.  Having enough time to work out your marketing and promotional strategy will also help you polish that strategy and see what works and what doesn’t work in practice. However, if the distribution is not something you gave a lot of thought to, before you started production or just right after the post-production began, you will have to get on with the job as soon as possible.  I do agree that having an …

What Is Spike Lee’s Writing Process Like?

Spike Lee is an American film director, producer, writer and actor. He is known for such films as: “She’s Gotta Have It”, “Do the Right Thing”, “Malcolm X” and, most recently, “BlackkKlansman”.  Spike always dedicates one notebook, in which he collects ideas for a story, names of the characters, dialogue, plot points, etc. Once the notebook is filled up, he transfers all those ideas into the index cards. He puts the index cards in order, in which he would like the story to go. This process helps him visualize the story. At the same time as working on the fictional elements of the story, Spike is also doing his research (of course if this is what his story requires). The research combined with the fictional elements of the story gives him enough material to start writing the script. He believes that everyone should devote specific time of the day to just writing the script without any external interruptions such as: emails, phone calls or social media. Find out more about writing and filmmaking at Indie …

Confidence, Creativity and Perfection.

One of the best things you can pass onto your child is confidence. Without real and solid confidence gained in childhood, adult life can turn out to be pretty tricky and filled with lots of disappointment. People, who suffer from low confidence often choose safer, less aspirational career paths, because they don’t believe they can do something out of the ordinary or follow their “unrealistic” dreams until it becomes a reality. Safer career choices often mean working in places that only pay the bills, not in places that could get them excited every morning before leaving for work. Despite their personal ambition and high education, those people often get trapped in jobs that are way below their qualifications and education level. All because lack of confidence won’t allow them to move on. If, from a young age, you are told that certain things in life are impossible to achieve and dreaming more realistically is more practical and safer (as if dreams should be more realistic, practical, or safer), it’s easy to give up on yourself, …

How Mira Nair Auditions Actors?

Mira Nair is a film director and producer, her best-known films include: “Salaam Bombay”, “Monsoon Wedding”, “Mississippi Masala”, “Kama Sutra: A Tale of Love”. Her recent films include: “The Reluctant Fundamentalist” and “Queen of Katwe”. 1. Make sure actors feel comfortable and relaxed during the casting process. If actors feel pressured or judged, they will be less likely to take risks. 2. During the casting process as a director, you should create an affectionate and warm atmosphere that will allow actors to breathe easier, and as a result, relax better. 3. Encourage all performances to bring something fresh and unexpected to the table. 4. Establishing the trust between you, as a director, and your actors are the key to successful collaboration. 5. Find moments in your script, which best shows the essence of each character. Find those scenes and use them during the audition. 6. Make the audition room safe space for the actors. 7. Start your casting with small talk. 8. Ask the actors if they have any questions for you before the audition …