All posts filed under: Writing

London Is Lagging Behind

In 2016 the UK decided to leave the European Union. The moment the Leave vote won, the drama surrounding the deal, no deal, ministers, elections, and the basic understanding of what leaving the EU would mean for the UK took over every inch of political and social life. Surprisingly, or perhaps not, the majority, including the politicians voting to leave the EU, didn’t understand what EU is and what leaving the EU means. So much efforts, energy and money has been already devoted to Brexit that London, which used to be one of the most exciting cities in the world, is starting to fall behind many other European cities, which are pioneering in sustainability, sustainable lifestyle and start-ups creating conscious economy, conscious consumption, and conscious lifestyle. Like any other mammoth city, London needs sustainability; it needs green incentives, cleaner air and, in London’s case, it surely needs a conscious lifestyle. But unfortunately, London is way too busy, focusing on Brexit and what it means for the city’s economy, art sector and future development. We have …

Effective Pitching For Filmmakers, Writers and Storytellers

Before you even begin to think about pitching  your projects to anyone, I would strongly advise you to answer and identify the following questions: – What is your target market? Do you know your target market, niche audience? Who is going to buy your product, idea or service? – What are the benefits your target market can achieve by working with you or by buying your product? – What problems are you going to solve for your target market? – Do you have a category under which your product/offering can be featured? How can you describe your product? – What results your market needs & wants that you can help them achieve? – Have you got a few (2-3) keywords describing your product or offering that can be used for your marketing & promotional purposes? – Have you checked out your competition to see what they do to promote their work or product? Once you can comfortably answer the above questions, you are ready to start working on structuring your pitches. Having answered the questions …

5 Places in Wroclaw I Always Go Back To

Wroclaw is a wonderfully cosmopolitan city in the south-west of Poland, where I was born and where I go back to at least twice a year. The city has changed massively since I was a child and I’m beyond grateful for that. When I’m in Wroclaw, apart from visiting friends and family, I always go back to those five places for food, coffee and drinks, and I can honestly recommend them to anyone who is travelling through, visiting or thinking of settling in Wroclaw (the order is random):   Pod Papugami – and old, established a restaurant on the Main Square (Rynek). The food they serve is traditional but with a touch of modern spin and the menu is always changed a bit with each coming season. The interior is full of old classic Hollywood posters, which gives the place a unique and one of a kind feel. Over the years the quality of food and the service has not changed and has always stayed delicious. Pod Papugami has been opened for as long as …

One Pager

I like making a One Pager for every scene in my shooting script. One Pager is for me only and reminds me of all the most important things I need in the scene for it to work for the audience. My One Pager consists of: The scene in a nutshell (one line, what the view is about). How did the previous scene end? (precise ending of the last scene and how that will impact the current scene). What are the beats in the scene and where are they (on which line, movement, gesture)? What are each characters’ objective/s in the scene? Are the characters going to reach their scene objectives or not? What is the stage direction for each character (what I have imagined and would like to try out with the actors)? How is the scene going to end (what frame, movement, or gesture)? What are the characters wearing (I know that this is the costume department, but I like making a note of the costumes, especially when/if the character is wearing something very …

The Receipt for a Good Family Movie

As a parent, I watch a lot of PG, family-friendly films and over the years I realised that the most successful family films have those five things in common: 1. One of the characters is an animal. It doesn’t have to be the main character, but the animal is an integral part of the whole plot, like ‘Babe’ or ‘Stuart Little.’ 2. The main character is usually an underdog and comes from the background with either financial difficulties, or emotional baggage, has a lot of self-doubts, and their confidence is either very low or doesn’t exist at all. During the film, the character discovers that the confidence doesn’t come from the external possessions but the inner strength. Good examples here are ‘Charlie and the Chocolate Factory’, ‘Hugo’, or ‘Karate Kid.’ 3. Kids can easily identify with the character because they experience the emotional upheavals often felt and agonised over by themselves, such as lack of friends, feelings of isolation and not being part of the group, feeling alienated at school, especially when they struggle or …