All posts filed under: Visual Content

Effective Pitching For Filmmakers, Writers and Storytellers

Before you even begin to think about pitching  your projects to anyone, I would strongly advise you to answer and identify the following questions: – What is your target market? Do you know your target market, niche audience? Who is going to buy your product, idea or service? – What are the benefits your target market can achieve by working with you or by buying your product? – What problems are you going to solve for your target market? – Do you have a category under which your product/offering can be featured? How can you describe your product? – What results your market needs & wants that you can help them achieve? – Have you got a few (2-3) keywords describing your product or offering that can be used for your marketing & promotional purposes? – Have you checked out your competition to see what they do to promote their work or product? Once you can comfortably answer the above questions, you are ready to start working on structuring your pitches. Having answered the questions …

One Pager

I like making a One Pager for every scene in my shooting script. One Pager is for me only and reminds me of all the most important things I need in the scene for it to work for the audience. My One Pager consists of: The scene in a nutshell (one line, what the view is about). How did the previous scene end? (precise ending of the last scene and how that will impact the current scene). What are the beats in the scene and where are they (on which line, movement, gesture)? What are each characters’ objective/s in the scene? Are the characters going to reach their scene objectives or not? What is the stage direction for each character (what I have imagined and would like to try out with the actors)? How is the scene going to end (what frame, movement, or gesture)? What are the characters wearing (I know that this is the costume department, but I like making a note of the costumes, especially when/if the character is wearing something very …

What Does Film Director Really Do?

As a film student I read many books written by film directors, who I admired but I never fully understood what film director’s job was and what do they do on and off the set. It all became clear to me once I started making my films, making mistakes, and learning from them. Below you will find my personal list of the director’s responsibilities/what film directors really do: 1. A director must protect the story and make sure it is told in the best possible way for the audience to enjoy. 2. Before walking onto the film set, the director needs to analyse the script and use that in-depth analysis to understand the story, and then use that understanding as a storytelling tool. 3. The director must know the script, the story, and the characters inside out before going into production. 4. Be prepared to work with the actors. If needed, the director should have a little reminder session of how to work with the actors to help them develop their characters. 5. The director …

Should You Agree to Work for Free?

This is a question many people in the creative sector will be asking themselves throughout their careers, and unfortunately, the “offers” to work for free don’t end the older you become or, the more experience you have. When I left the film school, it was believed that you needed to work for at least two years for free to break into the industry before receiving paid job offers. I graduated from the film school in 2004, and as of this writing, I do not accept job offers, which are for free. Having said that I am always more than happy to work on friends’ projects for free and help the people who helped me out. But these are people I knew and worked with; these people are not random individuals I found online and decided to approach expecting to work on my projects for many hours, and many days and weeks for free. I get lots of offers to work for free with a vague promise of a payment sometime in the very indefinite future. …

How to Make Videos More Appealing to Your Audience?

1. Make sure you record your audio correctly. People can put up with out of focus images but if the audio is off, you will have a hard time attracting viewers. 2. Make your videos short and to the point. I’m not a big fan of long-winded videos that in reality could have been cut down to a few minutes. 3. If your video is short, don’t introduce rapid, MTV cutting; it will only make your audience feel sick from too fast editing and too much movement. 4. Don’t mislead your audience with your video’s title; make sure your title accurately describes your video and what’s in it. 5. Don’t cover too much ground in one short video. If you try to cover too many subjects in a short space of time, you may find hard to hold audience’s attention. Make your videos very specific. If it is ‘how to’ video you are making, answer just one question, not gazillion at the same time. 6. Don’t use special effect excessively, especially if it doesn’t look …