All posts filed under: Films

Mexican Cinematography: the Latin Hollywood

Mexican Cinematography began its development in the 1920’s. The first films were mainly documentary newsreels called noticiarios (notices), which showed everyday life in Mexico. Unfortunately, many of these films have been lost or destroyed. It was not long before the production of feature films was to commence. Most of them were melodramas, comedies and adventure films produced by Salvador Toscano Barragan, the Alva brothers and Ezequiel Carrasco following in the fashion of Hollywood and Italian productions. It was at this time when the first Mexican film stars appeared: Dolores del Rio, Lupe Velez and Mimi Derba. After getting their careers started in Mexico they all, eventually, emigrated to the United States to continue their careers. The most important film studio of that time was Azteca Studios which was founded by Mimi Derba. The 1930’s saw a change in the cinematic landscape of Mexico. The most spectacular herald of these changes appeared to be the visit of the leading Soviet film director, Sergei Eisenstein, who was in Mexico to shoot his film Que Viva Mexico! (1930). Eisenstein’s tour had a significant effect on the Mexican filmmakers employed to work in …

Irish Cinematography : Difficult History, Important Movies

The history of Irish cinematography is intimately connected with the history of the country which, above all else, is the history of the constant battle for independence and national, political and cultural identity. The history of Irish cinematography is closely connected with the history of the country which, above all else, is the history of the constant battle for independence and national, political and cultural identity. Ireland, pushed aside for a long time as Europe’s backwater and remaining in the shade of the British Empire, could only begin to raise itself once it had achieved its independence. The cinematography of Ireland is a reflection of these changes. The first feature film, which was silent, The Lad of Old Ireland, was produced in 1910 by the American Sidney Olcott and was the typical immigrant story about a young man forced by economic conditions to search for his fortune overseas. It was pretty successful in the USA because of the prevalent theme of the day regarding emigration to the United States – the Promised Land for newcomers from the Old Continent. …

Case Study of a Short Film: “The Man With The Spying Glass” part 2

Case Study of a Short Film: “The Man With The Spying Glass” Production Finally, after all this pre-production work it is time for the production. The first big problem for us occurred a week before the production. The camera operator got another job, and we had to start shooting a day before we had scheduled to do it. Luckily everyone was available. The call time for the first shooting day was 7 am. We scheduled to start shooting at 10 am. Of course, we didn’t. We started shooting at midday. Try to stick with the shooting schedule even if it’s close to impossible. Otherwise, it creates problems for the whole crew and cast. If you start shooting late, you will finish late, keep that in mind. On the first day we finished shooting at 10.pm so not that bad but… on the second day, we ended at 2.00 am. We only had the studio booked for shooting for two days so we had to finish all the interior scenes within those two days. Unfortunately, we made …

Case Study of a Short Film: “The Man With The Spying Glass” part 1

Case Study of a Short Film: “The Man With The Spying Glass” part 1 Below is the case study I created by my last short film as well as my general experience as a filmmaker on this production. “The Man With The Spying Glass” is a self-financed short film. Production: 3 days Post-production: 7 weeks Length: 13’51 min Placit lives in a dreamless society where people have to take pills to stop dreaming and thinking. Almost everyone wears helmets, which gives the global government access to human thoughts.   Placit’s most profound dream is to be a puppeteer, an artist, someone that the official government disapproves. However, he is afraid to go against the system which was created by his father and strongly guarded by Placit’s cynical self. Concept First I had an idea about a man living in a hotel room and spying on people using a spying glass. I started playing with the spying glass idea. Then I started asking myself questions… what if my character would do this or that? What if? Why …

Asian Cinematography

Asian cinematography as a definition refers to the cinematography of eastern, south-eastern and southern Asia (Far East cinema) and also western Asia (Near East cinema). The Far East cinema includes naming only the most important ones, Japan, China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, South Korea (North Korea, ridiculous as it sounds, is classified as one of the European cinematographies), Cambodia, Thailand, Iran, Tadjikistan and India. The Near East, cinema-wise, includes first and foremost the cinematographies of Turkey and Israel. The history of Asian movie art is very long. Its beginnings go back to the optical experiments in the 10th century when the first successful projections with camera obscura were conducted. The evolution of Asian cinema has run parallel to the growth of her European sister. Nevertheless, this cinematography was then and is up to this day, independent from both Europe and Hollywood, continually evolving and keeping its own, specific cinema style and language. Until the 1950’s Asian cinema had been so hermetic that it had hardly existed for audiences from the European cultural circle. This is particularly …