All posts filed under: filmmaking

Filmmaking Isn’t Just Pointing Camera in One Direction and Recording.

Many people go into business of making videos and films, believing that pointing the camera in one direction and pressing record is the way filmmaking works. Unfortunately, this idea is hugely misleading since filmmaking is not only about pointing your camera in one direction and recording whatever happens in front of it. Of course, there are some documentary filmmakers, who simply point cameras in one direction and record the events happening in front of them. However, for the purpose of this blog, we are talking about narrative filmmaking that requires much more planning and pre-production. First of all, you need to have a reason why you want to point the camera in that particular direction and why not opposite. What is in that frame that will give your audience information and understanding of the story, character motivation, and actions? Before you start setting up your framing, you should always consider if that particular frame is going to move the story forward, add something new to the story and is not random or accidental. Whatever makes …

Filmmaking Is Much More Than Just the Equipment

Telling a story, developing a story, organising production, selling the finished product, finding the audience; all those elements are part of every filmmaking process. Unfortunately, nowadays it seems that quite many filmmakers have forgotten that having the newest or most expensive equipment is not the beginning, the middle, or the end of the filmmaking process. Every production stage needs focus, understanding, knowledge and time to be developed, brainstormed and re-worked if necessary.  A lot of people think that the fancier the equipment one has, the better the product will be. Maybe visually the project you work on can be on the higher end, but there are lots of questions you, a filmmaker, need to answer before you start setting up your shots: – What is your story about? – How are the characters developed in your story? – Is the story coherent? – What is your budget? – How are you going to market your film to your audience? – Who is your target audience? If the story is not strong and developed enough, no amount of …

Pitching Your Projects 

Pitching projects to decision-makers, other filmmakers, financiers, and anyone else who could help you get your project off the ground is not an easy job. It requires skills and practice, as well as determination and persistence. There are specific formulas for pitching projects at different pitching stages. Usually, you wouldn’t just go into a meeting or meet someone at the part and straight away offer them your complete pitch. You typically start with a comparable pitch or with a logline before you move any further, and it is only if the listener asks you for more information about your project. The best way to practise your pitching skills is in front of other people, and way before you arrive at your big meeting. Practice will help you get comfortable with your pitch, and it will also help you work out what works and what doesn’t in your formula. Personally, I like printing out my pitch to read it out loud. This exercise helps me find out where my language is a bit wobbly or where I …

You Made A Film What Happens Next

This is the big question; one every filmmaker asks themselves during the production process. Partially, you should know who your target audience is, and who is going to watch your film, before you start the development process and invest a ton of time and energy into that project. The sooner you start thinking about your distribution options and possibilities, the sooner you will be able to start the marketing and promotion efforts. And, the sooner you start to market and promote your film, the bigger the audience you will be able to reach, and the more fans you will be able to find.  Having enough time to work out your marketing and promotional strategy will also help you polish that strategy and see what works and what doesn’t work in practice. However, if the distribution is not something you gave a lot of thought to, before you started production or just right after the post-production began, you will have to get on with the job as soon as possible.  I do agree that having an …

What Is Spike Lee’s Writing Process Like?

Spike Lee is an American film director, producer, writer and actor. He is known for such films as: “She’s Gotta Have It”, “Do the Right Thing”, “Malcolm X” and, most recently, “BlackkKlansman”.  Spike always dedicates one notebook, in which he collects ideas for a story, names of the characters, dialogue, plot points, etc. Once the notebook is filled up, he transfers all those ideas into the index cards. He puts the index cards in order, in which he would like the story to go. This process helps him visualize the story. At the same time as working on the fictional elements of the story, Spike is also doing his research (of course if this is what his story requires). The research combined with the fictional elements of the story gives him enough material to start writing the script. He believes that everyone should devote specific time of the day to just writing the script without any external interruptions such as: emails, phone calls or social media. Find out more about writing and filmmaking at Indie …