All posts filed under: filmmaking

How to Develop Characters for Your Stories?

1. Who is the character? Who does the character want to be? What makes your character/s come to life? What sort of person is your character; you need to dig deep to see how a real person would behave and react in the circumstances you are putting your characters in. 2. Where does your character/s come from? 3. What is the place the character ends up in? How is the character going to change on the way to that place? 4. How will the community change because of the problem/s the character is facing or trying to solve/sort out? 5. How far and in what direction is the story going to push the character? 6. Who is the storyteller in the story? 7. The characters need to be put in the situations that will allow them to go outside of their comfort zone. 8. The character is the one that needs to change, not the world around them. 9. What is your hook? (a hook — what the story is about, have it clear in …

Writers on Writing: Aaron Sorkin

Aaron Sorkin is one of the most celebrated and accomplished writers working in Hollywood at the moment. He writes for film, TV, and theatre. He is the creator of “West Wing” and “The Newsroom” and the scriptwriter behind “The Social Network” and “Steve Jobs”. In 2017 he directed Jessica Chastain in “Molly’s Game”, which I personally loved. Since I really like his writing style and him as a writer, I’ve decided to put together some of his top tips for other writers and screenwriters. AARON SORKIN’S GENERAL TIPS ABOUT SCRIPTWRITING 1. In order to create a solid screenplay, focus on developing strong intention and obstacle in your story. That will help you create friction and tension you need to hold the audiences’ attention. Once you have a strong, formidable intention and obstacle, you’re ready to write at least the first scene. 2. Define the intention and obstacle of the first scene you are going to write. Use index cards to map out the next few scenes. Focus on progress, while setting milestones for yourself to …

Working With Actors: Rehearsal

1. Rehearsal allows the actors to gain extra experience that will help them build the character while shooting. 2. During the rehearsal process, you get actors to ask the questions and give them specific experiences — ‘as if’ situations, scenarios to work with. Try not to give answers to their questions directly. 3. Get questions from the actors regarding the story and the characters. Give them an additional experience instead of answering the questions directly. 4. Samples of exercises you may find useful: – Get the actors to stand in front of each other and ask them to mirror one another. First one actor, then another. – Group mirroring exercise. – To create intimacy, you can ask the actors to hug one another. – Build intimacy on the memory of past intimacy. – Empower your actors to kiss in the rehearsals; of course, if this is part of the story. – Kissing exercise: Look each other in the eyes Lick your lips Look each other in the eyes Lick your lips Tilt your head one …

Filmmaking: Director’s Perspective

1. You have script, actors, and the camera at your disposal to tell the story. 2. Try to always set up the scene as real events as may be seen through the eyes of the characters. 3. Think about what the character sees, feels and decides to do with what they see and feel can be a good starting point for placing the camera. 4. If you aren’t the writer of the story, you should empower the writer to search deeply for the right solutions for the characters. You shouldn’t give the right solutions to the characters’ problems; this isn’t your job. 5. What tools can you use to direct the scene/film? Back-story. Scenes objective. Filmmaking tools such as camera movement, lights, design, setting, location, music, sound, colour etc. 6. You take responsibility for what you tell your actors and what you talk about during the rehearsal or just before the take. 7. You need to be brave and have the courage to tell your cast and crew what is your vision of the story and what you …

Creative Distribution Case Study for a Film “Ringside”

My recommendations and suggestions are based on a “Ringside” trailer I watched and the EPK I read. £1000 Budget – it’s a fantastic achievement, James; let me congratulate you on that. With such a small budget, you should be bragging about this every time you give an interview, write a guest blog post or mention your film. When creating blog posts, interviews with cast and crew, or any other promotional materials, always, always mention your budget. It’s awe-inspiring that with sheer willpower, talent and determination, you pulled it together. In your promotional videos, which you will use as a part of your marketing and promotion, you can talk about the challenges of working with little money and how you managed to overcome them. People always admire others who are passionate about their craft. Social Media – as much as you might not like social media, there is no denying you need those to find your audience today. FB ads (you might not agree with FB’s social conduct, but they’re still the best in business) will allow you …