All posts filed under: filmmaking

Traditional Way Of Film Distribution

You have finally finished your film and decided that the best way to distribute your work of art is with the help of a sales agent. A good sales agent (in the perfect world but remember, filmmaking business is far from perfect) will represent your film at markets, film festivals, introduce you and your film to distributors, and try to sell your film to networks, hotel chains and airlines.  However, in reality, many films are sold in bundles combined with other films that are either the same genre or touch on the same or similar subject matter. Sales agents usually put catalogues of films together and try to sale them for one flat fee to TV stations or local distributors. Ideally, sales agents should try to sell films they represent to distributors, who in turn distribute those films to cinema chains, TV networks, hotels, airlines, or the VOD platforms. In the traditional model of film distribution, the sales agents are the link between the filmmaker and the distribution company. However, currently, this model is quickly changing, …

Can a Sales Agent Stop a Filmmaker from Contacting the Distributor Directly?

In short, a sales agent cannot stop a filmmaker from contacting a distributor directly, as long as the latter didn’t sign a contract with the sales agent. If one did though, they have to check what the said contract says about directly contacting the distributor. If it’s you, make sure you will not be in breach of your contract, if you get in touch with the distributor/s directly. However, if you haven’t signed a contract with the sales agent but only have been casually talking about your project and potential representing you and your project, you will have to decide if you want to build a long-lasting relationship with this particular sales agent or not. If you decide that the relationship isn’t too important, nothing should stop you from contacting distributors directly. What to do when you decide to contact a distributor directly? – Before you reach out to a distributor, check their website to see what type of films they represent. If the distributor makes a point of saying on their website, “no unsolicited …

Filmmaking Isn’t Just Pointing Camera in One Direction and Recording.

Many people go into business of making videos and films, believing that pointing the camera in one direction and pressing record is the way filmmaking works. Unfortunately, this idea is hugely misleading since filmmaking is not only about pointing your camera in one direction and recording whatever happens in front of it. Of course, there are some documentary filmmakers, who simply point cameras in one direction and record the events happening in front of them. However, for the purpose of this blog, we are talking about narrative filmmaking that requires much more planning and pre-production. First of all, you need to have a reason why you want to point the camera in that particular direction and why not opposite. What is in that frame that will give your audience information and understanding of the story, character motivation, and actions? Before you start setting up your framing, you should always consider if that particular frame is going to move the story forward, add something new to the story and is not random or accidental. Whatever makes …

Filmmaking Is Much More Than Just the Equipment

Telling a story, developing a story, organising production, selling the finished product, finding the audience; all those elements are part of every filmmaking process. Unfortunately, nowadays it seems that quite many filmmakers have forgotten that having the newest or most expensive equipment is not the beginning, the middle, or the end of the filmmaking process. Every production stage needs focus, understanding, knowledge and time to be developed, brainstormed and re-worked if necessary.  A lot of people think that the fancier the equipment one has, the better the product will be. Maybe visually the project you work on can be on the higher end, but there are lots of questions you, a filmmaker, need to answer before you start setting up your shots: – What is your story about? – How are the characters developed in your story? – Is the story coherent? – What is your budget? – How are you going to market your film to your audience? – Who is your target audience? If the story is not strong and developed enough, no amount of …

Pitching Your Projects 

Pitching projects to decision-makers, other filmmakers, financiers, and anyone else who could help you get your project off the ground is not an easy job. It requires skills and practice, as well as determination and persistence. There are specific formulas for pitching projects at different pitching stages. Usually, you wouldn’t just go into a meeting or meet someone at the part and straight away offer them your complete pitch. You typically start with a comparable pitch or with a logline before you move any further, and it is only if the listener asks you for more information about your project. The best way to practise your pitching skills is in front of other people, and way before you arrive at your big meeting. Practice will help you get comfortable with your pitch, and it will also help you work out what works and what doesn’t in your formula. Personally, I like printing out my pitch to read it out loud. This exercise helps me find out where my language is a bit wobbly or where I …