All posts filed under: Blog

5 Tips on Telling Good Stories

1. The secret to good storytelling is knowing your audience. 2. If you are trying to capture your audience, start with something they already know and can easily relate to. 3. Tapping into shared experiences will help you capture your audience. (What are yours and your viewers common and shared experiences?) 4. Use those shared experiences to hook your audience. 5. Good storytelling keeps the audience engaged by twists, turns, and cliff hangers. This way you will keep the audience waiting for the story to evolve and wanting more of the story. Indie Filmmaking School

Marketing and Promoting A Film Is A Group Effort

Filmmaking is a collaborative art form and anyone, who has ever made a film knows this obvious truth. Of course, there are instances when one filmmaker makes the entire film on their own or with very limited help. But these are rather exceptions than a norm. In my opinion, doing everything or almost everything on your own, while making a film is an uphill endeavour that I wouldn’t wish upon anyone to experience; especially if you take into consideration that the beauty of this art form is in the collectiveness of ideas and talents, all trying to create one coherent vision. Marketing and promoting a film shouldn’t be any different. To make the final product successful, the whole team of people needs to come together to find the best ways to reach an audience and make them aware of the film in hope that they will pay to see that very film. In big-budget productions, there is a whole team of marketers, PR agencies and promoters pushing the product in front of the audience. Some …

Scriptwriting In A Nutshell: External Antagonist and/or Obstacle

As a writer, you need to care for your external antagonist as much as you care for your main character. The external antagonist or the external obstacle that the main character is trying to overcome is going to drive your story; and strong, consistent obstacle or antagonist can only benefit your story. Things, bad things need to happen to your hero before they reach the end of their journey. Those events are triggered by the antagonist or obstacles, which often are out of the hero’s control. As a writer, you have to make the antagonist or the obstacles compelling enough for the audience to care for them. Often in films and stories, if the antagonist is not as strong and compelling as the protagonist, the story isn’t exciting and fails to attract an audience or readers. So, while working on your external antagonist or the external obstacles that at the end of the day will make your character take action, you need to make sure that those are characters and circumstances you, as a writer, …

Scriptwriting In A Nutshell: Obstacles We Care About

As screenwriters, our job is to make our main character’s journey throughout the whole film as exciting and challenging as possible. If we don’t put any obstacles on the protagonist’s way, our film will be very short and most likely uneventfully boring. Film is kind of imitation of life, and real life is filled with obstacles at every turn. According to Alex Epstein, there are three basic kinds of obstacles: a.    External antagonist b.    Intimate opponent c.    A tragic or comic flaw In your script, you need at least one kind of obstacle, taking centre stage in your story. However, a lot of screenwriters throw all three obstacles (a, b, and c) at the protagonist to make their life as miserable as possible. In real life, when we encounter problems, we try to solve them, which in reality means that bit-by-bit our problem/s (think obstacles in the film) will get resolved.  When you write a screenplay, you want to make your character’s problems as big as possible, possibly even coming all at …

Scriptwriting In A Nutshell: Make Your Characters Different

  To Learn more about Scriptwriting check out my Indie Filmmaking School    When creating characters, a common mistake many new writers make is to create characters that are too similar to one another. I made that mistake countless times myself. If the characters we have created are too similar to one another, they will act in the same way, will wear identical clothes, or will order the same place in the same place. Your reader will quickly get confused, often too confused to carry on reading your screenplay. In your, the writer’s, mind you might be seeing your characters very differently than you describe them on paper. However, your reader will not see what is in your mind. For the reader to know what you see, you need to include the differences between your characters in your script. It can be anything from the way they wear their hair to the type of tea they drink in the morning. If your characters are too similar, you will lose your reader pretty quickly, and your screenplay …